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2015 - 2016 Premier Research Grant


 
                                                                             
The Alzheimer Society London and Middlesex is pleased to announce the winner of the Premier Research Grant, Dr. Robert Bartha. This grant, awarded by the Alzheimer Society's Foundation, is a $100,000 grant (over two years) to support research, personnel and supportive infrastructure. Dr. Bartha is a Western Medical Biophysics professor of the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and is a member of Western’s Brain and Mind Institute. Dr. Bartha is also a Robarts Research Institute scientist. His project, Metabolic and Functional Brain State: New Indicators of Early Alzheimer’s Disease looks to develop a sensitive test for early Alzheimer’s disease using the most powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment in Canada. If successful, Dr. Bartha’s test will detect the disease at a time when the brain can still be repaired. Such a test would speed up the development and testing of new drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease.
Congratulations to Dr. Bartha, we wish him and his team success with this important research.
To read Dr. Bartha's January 2016 interim report, please click here. For Dr. Bartha's January 2017 report, click here.



2013 - 2014 Premier Research Grant Recipient
 

Stefan KohlerThe Alzheimer Society London and Middlesex is pleased to announce the winner of the Premier Research Grant, Dr. Stefan Kohler.  This grant, awarded by the Foundation of the Alzheimer Society London and Middlesex, is a $100,000 grant (over two years) to support research, personnel and supportive infrastructure. Dr. Kohler is a Western psychology professor who is a member of Western’s Brain and Mind Institute. His research, calledDelusional misidentifications in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, explores the neurological impairment caused by dementia that leads to patients believing well-known people (usually primary caregivers) have changed identities. The project is investigating changes in physiological arousal, which is normally part of recognizing family members, which leads to this misidentification by the sufferer.  Findings from this study may offer guidance to caregivers and strategies for intervention.

Congratulations to Dr. Kohler, we wish him and his team success with this important research.

To read Dr. Kohler's research report, please click here.